Vienna - the city of art and culture! In addition to numerous relicts from the Imperial Era, Vienna has also established itself into a modern scene. The mix of historical buildings and contemporary elements creates an unrivalled atmosphere and just, creates highlights for everyone. 

MuseumsQuartier

Just a few minutes away from ARCOTEL Wimberger, the MuseumsQuartier unites the enjoyment art and life with around 60 cultural institutions. The courtyards, cafés and shops turn it into an oasis of relaxation in the heart of the city and the mix of historical buildings and contemporary museum architecture provide a unique atmosphere. 

Further information: www.mqw.at

Imperial Furniture Collection

The Imperial Furniture Collection presents the largest collection of furniture in the world. The furniture culture across three centuries is put to display - ranging from the imperial furnishings through to different styles of furnishings from Biedermeier and Wiener Moderne (Viennese Modern Era) as well as the contemporary furnishing culture.

Information on the Imperial Furniture Collection: www.hofmobiliendepot.at

Westlicht Gallery

In the former glass factory, which, for a long time, was used a photo studio, is now a photo museum with regularly changing exhibitions and a historical camera selection. 

For photography fans: www.westlicht.com

Ottakringer Brewery

You can discover the art of brewing beer first-hand during tours through Vienna’s oldest private brewery. The brewery is now one of the best locations for events in the city and attracts visitors due to its many different events. 

Information on beer and more: www.ottakringerbrauerei.at

Theatre at Spittelberg

Encounters of all aspects of life influence the area around Spittelberg. The theatre offers diverse productions that range from cabaret to world music, international acts through to the local newcomer scene, from adult theatre through to comedy for children.

Information and programme: www.theateramspittelberg.at

VIENNESE MODERNISM Klimt.Schiele.Wagner.Moser.

THE PERIOD FROM 1890 TO 1918 WAS A FASCINATING TIME IN AUSTRIAN CULTURAL HISTORY. THE HABSBURG-LED DUAL MONARCHY OF AUSTRIA-HUNGARY WAS TEETERING WILDLY BETWEEN BEAUTY AND ABYSS, A DYNAMIC THAT ALSO LEFT ITS IMPRESSION ON THE IMPORTANT ARTISTIC ERA KNOWN AS VIENNESE MODERNISM. THIS MOVEMENT INFLUENCED DEVELOPMENTS IN ART, LITERATURE, ARCHITECTURE, MUSIC, PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY AND IMPACTED ALL OF SOCIETY. ARTISTS WERE THE PIONEERS OF THIS CHANGE, AND THEIR WORKS CHALLENGED THE STAGNANT MONARCHY. REVOLUTIONARY THINKING TOOK HOLD IN ALL AREAS OF LIFE. UNTIL THE ATROCITIES OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR SHOOK THE GLOBE.

In 1910, Vienna had a population of two million, more than it does today, and was the fifth largest city in the world. It was one of Europe’s intellectual and artistic centres. Everything was concentrated in Vienna, and new things were being created at almost every turn. In this exciting time full of creativity and optimism, the painters Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, the architect Otto Wagner and the universal artist Koloman Moser, all of them at the height of their artistic creation, left an indelible mark on the city. In Vienna’s coffeehouses, writers like Karl Kraus and Peter Altenberg debated with fellow intellectuals and artists. Architects such as Otto Wagner, Adolf Loos, Josef Hoffmann and Joseph Maria Olbrich experimented with new materials to create architectural concepts that were a striking departure from the historicist “Ringstraße style”. Gustav Klimt’s paintings reflected the artistic and scientific developments that shaped the period. Egon Schiele’s unflinching self-portraits, Otto Wagner’s ideas for a modern capital, Koloman Moser’s designs, Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis, Gustav Mahler’s modern symphonies and Arnold Schoenberg’s twelve-tone music are just some of the most important accomplishments of the age.

Society also underwent dramatic change at the turn of the century. Gustav Klimt’s portraits of women give an indication of the emergence of an increasingly confident middle class. His 1898 portrait of Sonja Knips elevated him to the role of portraitist to a well-heeled Viennese bourgeoisie. His likenesses of Fritza Riedler and Adele Bloch-Bauer (the “Golden Adele” is one of the most expensive paintings in the world) or of his companion Emilie Flöge, an emancipated and modern woman, have lost nothing of their appeal. Artists, politicians and scientists met in the salons of Vienna’s Jewish upper middle class. And women were taking on a new, more emancipated role. Important women of the time included Alma Mahler-Werfel, Rosa Mayreder, Grete Wiesenthal, Lina Loos, Gina Kaus and Berta Zuckerkandl.

“It must have been very interesting in Vienna back then…” The Austrian writer Hermann Bahr was absolutely right when he used these words to describe turn-of-the-century Vienna. Many masterpieces of art, architecture and design associated with Vienna all over the world were created during this era, including Gustav Klimt’s “The Kiss”, Egon Schiele’s “Portrait of Wally”, Otto Wagner’s Austrian Postal Savings Bank building and Koloman Moser’s designs for Wiener Werkstätte. These four protagonists played an especially defining role in making the fin de siècle period such an important time for art in Vienna and Austria. They all passed away in 1918. A hundred years later, Vienna is taking an in-depth look at the creative output of these four important representatives of Viennese Modernism. The city is celebrating the anniversary year with countless exhibitions and events. Now, as then, Vienna is a vibrant hub for the arts and the creative sector.

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